Holistic Muscle Pain Massage Therapy – Holistic Muscle Massage Pain Solutions

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holistic massage is a well-known treatment that not only focusses on tense muscles as a physical result of stress, but it also takes into account a client’s emotional and spiritual wellbeing. … By definition, Holistic Massage treats the whole body as a single entity and is specifically tailored to each client. Holistic massage therapy provides a non-intrusive way of healing that is derived from the direct needs of their body. Holistic massage therapy is “an individual treatment that is specifically tailored to each client” and considers their mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing.

A holistic view of health considers that your mind, body, and vitality are indivisible and interdependent. Stress and emotions can have major impacts on your physical body. On the other hand, taking care of your body will help your mind feel superb. Therefore, the intention of a Holistic Deep Tissue Massage is to give your entire body and mind a deep, relaxing and invigorating treatment.

Although longer time will be spent on areas of your body that hold more tension (e.g. shoulders, neck or lower back), the aim of this treatment is to work on your body in its entirety. This approach stimulates your own natural self-corrective capabilities to regain full health and function (homeostasis).

A Holistic Deep Tissue Massage can be very powerful and invigorating. The benefits of this treatment are improved body functioning, loss of pain, greater mobility, reduction of stress and anxiety, improved sleeping pattern and more enjoyment of life.

 

Massage therapy relaxes muscle tissue, which reduces painful contractions and spasms. Massage can also reduce nerve compression. To understand this, consider that when muscles are contracted, they sometimes compress the nerves around them. … Touching the skin or applying pressure relaxes muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Massage causes physiological changes in your body through:

  • The relaxation response, which is involuntary, yet the predictable response of the nervous system to massage techniques and touch
  • Mechanical responses, which are physical effects that occur in the body when pressure is applied to the soft tissues

Together, these responses can produce physical and emotional benefits.

What is the relaxation response?

In a massage, caring, safe touch is an invitation to relax. This, together with pain relief, generally produces a “relaxation response.”

The relaxation response is a state in which your heart and breathing rate slow, your blood pressure goes down, your production of stress hormones decreases, and your muscles relax. The relaxation response also seems to increase the available level of serotonin, which is a chemical in the body that positively affects emotions and thoughts. While this information is promising, more studies are needed to directly confirm the relationship between massage and levels of serotonin in the brain.

The relaxation response may decrease the physical effects of stress and reduce the risks associated with stress, such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, anxiety, insomnia, persistent fatigue, sexual dysfunction, digestive disorders, and psychological issues–to name a few.

What are mechanical responses?

 

 

 

 

 

 

The physical manipulation in massage has two major physical effects:

  • Increase in blood and lymph circulation
  • Relaxation and normalization of the soft tissue (muscle, connective tissue, tendons, ligaments), which releases nerves and deeper connective tissues

Improving Circulation

Massage is believed to improve blood and lymph circulation. This is probably due partly to the physical manipulation of soft tissue and partly to the chemicals released as part of the relaxation response.

Improved circulation can enhance the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to muscle cells. As cellular health improves, tissues function more efficiently. More efficient functioning leads to the removal of waste products and may increase the absorption of excess fluids and reduce swelling in soft tissues.

Relaxing Tissue

Massage therapy relaxes muscle tissue, which reduces painful contractions and spasms. Massage can also reduce nerve compression. To understand this, consider that when muscles are contracted, they sometimes compress the nerves around them. When these muscles are relaxed, the nerves are no longer compressed, and, in theory, can get proper nutrients and operate more efficiently. The nerves can assume their normal work of transmitting messages to and from the brain, which improves the functioning of the muscles and organs.

Touching the skin or applying pressure relaxes muscles, tendons, and ligaments. In addition, while some of the deeper tissues of the body, such as deep spinal musculature, cannot be easily accessed by a massage therapist, the release of more superficial layers of muscles may also affect these deeper layers. This can lead to both superficial and deep tissues finding a better alignment and balance.

Organs can also benefit from massage, as they share neurological pain pathways with muscles, bones, and nerves. When muscles, bones, or nerves are distressed, organs can sometimes reflect distress and dysfunction. For example, low back pain can intensify menstrual cramps and menstrual cramps can cause low back muscles to tense. Massage can, therefore, improve symptoms associated with the functioning of both the organ and the muscles.

Sore/aching muscles: Muscle soreness on the treated area is a common side effect following massage therapy. It is normal because the muscles worked with during a deep tissue massage may not have been touched or manipulated often, if ever. Soreness may feel in the days after the massage like a good workout.
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Great Holistic Therapy Ideas!

 

 

  1. Ginger. …
  2. Turmeric. …
  1. Capsaicin. …
  2. Valerian Root. …
  3. Magnesium. …
  4. Cats Claw. …
  5. Boswellia. …
  6. White willow bark.
  • Cherries and tart cherry juice.
  • Blueberries.
  • Protein.
  • Magnesium.
  • Curcumin.
  • Pomegranate juice.
  • Arnica.
  • Capsaicin.
  1. Stretch it out. …
  2. Warm up before weight training. …
  3. Hydrate. …
  4. Work out with correct form. …
  5. Jump in an ice bath. …
  6. Heat up later in the day. …
  7. Reach for pineapple or tart cherries. …
  8. Use your sore muscles.
  • Epsom Salt. Soaking in a tub of warm water with a couple of scoops of Epsom salt has been a proven method for addressing aching muscles over the years. …
  • Apple Cider Vinegar. …
  • Ginger. …
  • Heat and Cold. …
  • Turmeric. …
  • Garlic.
  • Ibuprofen, aspirin, and other NSAIDs damage your gut lining. …
  • NSAIDs feed bad gut bacteria. …
  • NSAIDs put you at high risk for heart attack and stroke. …
  • Cryotherapy. …
  • Hot/cold compresses. …
  • Curcumin and other herbal painkillers. …
  • Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF)
  1. Get 8 Hours of Shut-Eye. Don’t underestimate the importance of a good night’s sleep. …
  2. Hydrate. Drinking water after a tough workout can help rid your body of toxins and prevent dehydration. …
  3. Drink a Protein Shake. …
  4. Apply Muscle Creams. …
  5. Grab Some Aspirin. …
  6. Ice, Ice Baby. …
  7. Stretch Every Day. …
  8. Roll Out Sore Muscles.
Over-the-Counter Treatments for Nerve Pain
  • Topical painkillers. Many over-the-counter creams and ointments are sold to relieve nerve pain. …
  • Painkilling medicines. Some people with neuropathic pain turn to familiar over-the-counter painkillers like acetaminophen, aspirin, and ibuprofen. …
  • Supplements and vitamins.

Eccentric contractions cause more muscle damage and thus entail longer recovery. John Berardi, Ph.D., says that taking everything into account, a given muscle will not fully recover until seven to 14 days have elapsed after a hard workout. However, you can resume your workouts after 48 hours of rest.

RiktrPro Massage by Nicola, LMT
*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader. These statements are not expressions of legal opinion relative to the scope of practice, medical diagnosis or medical advice, nor do they represent an endorsement of any product, company or specific massage therapy technique, modality or approach. All trademarks, registered trademarks, brand names, registered brand names, logos, and company logos referenced in this post are the property of their owners.

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